5 Tips for Getting Through The First Week of Quitting Smoking

It was only a few years ago that smoking seemed the supreme popular worldwide pastime. It was not just sociably and medically acceptable it was positively encouraged as the social norm and advertising portrayed it as being “good for you.”

However, today this worldwide phenomenon is no longer favorable. Recent laws render it illegal to smoke in numerous places, and advertising shows quite graphic demonstrations of how dangerous smoking can be.

With smoking now being socially unacceptable and proven to cause severe health problems, why are countless people still smoking? The reason many people still smoke is that chemicals within the tobacco are highly addictive. It’s very easy to start this distasteful habit but to stop is not straightforward. If you’re still struggling to quit smoking after reading the following tips, then you should speak with a healthcare professional for more information on smoking cessation medication.

Smoking becomes a habit that the brain struggles to change, and the chemicals ingested from the tobacco tell the body that it must have more.

Quit Smoking

A realistic stance is important; it is not simple to quit smoking. It will require time, with some people making many attempts to quit before being able to stop completely. There are various physical and mental obstacles you’ll need to resolve before it is possible to say, “I do not smoke”. Studies have shown that people who can stop smoking for a week have a higher chance of being able to stop smoking completely. So, what can we organize in that first week to help us quit?

  1. Without a doubt, a positive mental attitude is top of the list. If the determination is not there, we will never be able to conduct this life-changing task. We must also avoid trying to convince ourselves that perhaps if we can cut down to one per day that everything will be OK: this will not work. It is also vitally important to understand and appreciate the problems that will occur during the first and later weeks of quitting. Talking with friends and creating a network of people who have successfully quit is beneficial. As with cognitive behavioral therapy, talking about the problem and concentrating on the present dilemma can help to avoid negative thoughts and sensations. Negative thoughts can only lead to failure.
  2. It is essential to create a plan of action, especially for that first week to help you through it. Understanding the problems and creating an action plan to combat the issues that will arise during that first week is paramount. There will be cravings as the nicotine levels in the body become reduced, but various products can help with this. Plan what you intend to utilize to help with these cravings.
  3. 60% of the human body is water. According to this study, published in the National Academies of Medicine, everybody should drink about 8 to 10 glasses of water a day. However, when quitting smoking, this is extra important as it helps to increase the metabolic rate slightly. There will be headaches as with any drug withdrawal, but water acts to help to cut these.
  4. As a part of the chemical changes within the body and the change in behavioral habits, an increased appetite is common. You will feel that you must perform something with your hands, so eating is a simple option to replace the cigarette that would typically have been chosen. While the odd sweet treat is reasonable, it is equally important to keep up a healthy diet. You will need excellent physical strength and feel fit to complete this task.
  5. Stress levels will increase dramatically, especially when the urge to smoke becomes severe. Finding effective ways of combating stress will help with the battle ahead. Walking and other forms of exercise are excellent ways to tackle any type of stress, along with breathing exercises and maintaining a decent sleep regime.