10 Hottest Places On Earth!!


10 Hottest Places On Earth!! From literal volcanic fields to unbelievable temperatures you probably didn’t even know existed …stay tuned to number 1 to find out the 10 hottest places on Earth!

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From literal volcanic fields to unbelievable temperatures you probably didn’t even know
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existed…stay tuned to number 1 to find out the 10 hottest places on Earth!
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Number 10: Dallol, Ethiopia.
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When you think of hot places, I bet you would at least consider one that is volcanically
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active as a potential “hotspot”.
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Pun intended.
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And that’s exactly what Dallol in Ethiopia was and is.
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You can find it in the Afar Depression of Ethiopia, and it is indeed an area that is
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affected by the prospect of being an erupting volcano, and that’s not even one of the only
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reasons it’s hot.
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Where it was located in Ethiopia is actually a mining site, and people did reside there
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for some time, and then, it became a ghost town.
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And given the heat, it’s not hard to see why.
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Just on average, yes…ON AVERAGE, the place would be about 90 degrees plus.
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During 1960-1966, the average temperature of Dallol was 94 degrees Fahrenheit, and recall
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that average doesn’t mean highest, so it could get even more intense.
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So…high average temperature…chance of the place erupting violently…yep, that’s
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not a good place to live.
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And this is only No.10.
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Number 9: Coober Pedy, Australia.
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On the surface (both literally and metaphorically), Coober Pedy, in Australia, seems like any
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other town in the world.
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It just so happens, that this town is right next to the biggest Opal mine in the world.
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But that doesn’t make the town rich, per se, and it definitely doesn’t help their location
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is in a place that has no shade or barricade from the sun, which can literally roast the
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surface where the people live.
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How do I define “roast”?
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Well, how about 113 degrees?
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That’s pretty hot.
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And so, the people of Coober Pedy did the only thing they could do…they moved into
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the mines.
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I’m serious, they did that.
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They moved into a series of mines and underground tunnels and caverns that they had been living
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next to and working in for years..
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If you go to the “actual” town, you’ll find houses…but they’re not lived in.
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So…why is a mine better than the surface?
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Well, first off, it’s cooler in there.
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Because of the design and the rock structure, you won’t get hotter than 75 degrees, which
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is at least 30 degrees cooler than what’s going on in the surface.
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At first, it must have been hard to live in those conditions, however, the people have
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made the most of it.
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And they’re now more or less thriving down there.
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Some have been able to outfit their homes with things like pools, which is no doubt
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a hot commodity down there…another…pun…intended.
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Either way, Coober Pedy is a very hot place in the world, but the people found a way to
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beat the heat…just by not being in it.
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Number 8: Wadi Halfa, Sudan.
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Before we check out Sudan, take a moment to like this video and join the Zero2Hero community
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You would think that a place that is close to a body of water would be immune to the
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heat of the world, but, as Wadi Halfa proves, it’s not the case.
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The temperature of this gateway city can get up to 127 degrees Fahrenheit.
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What do I mean by gateway city?
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Well, despite it being a part of Sudan (at the northern most point, interestingly enough),
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people go through Wadi Halfa in order to get to Egypt because of its location.
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Sadly, this version of Wadi Halfa is the second to bare the name, as the first had a very
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sad fate: “The original Wadi Halfa was submerged when
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the Aswan High Dam created Lake Nasser in 1971.
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At the time, approximately 50,000 inhabitants of the area were forcibly removed from their
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lands and relocated to the desert, where many died of malaria and other diseases.
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A few Wadi Halfans, however, remain along the Nile, the river that built their ancestors’
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identities as fishermen and river traders, building new settlements several times and
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finally settling on the current location when the flooding stopped.”
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Still, new or old, you better bring heat protection when going there.
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Number 7: Aghajari, Iran.
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If there’s one thing I’ve learned recently, it’s that no matter how hot or cold a place
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gets, it can most definitely be habited by a lot of people.
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Aghajari is the capital of the Aghajari District, in Behbahan County, Khuzestan Province, Iran.
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That’s a lot of names, yes, but they do have a point, it’s a capital city.
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And at one time, despite the intense heat, 65,000 people were a part of this city.
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Even though it would get as hot as 128 degrees, it was a thriving city.
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So what happened?
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Well, the war between Iran and Iraq eventually broke out, and when it did, the city was caught
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in the crossfire, and so most of the population left.
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Today, only about 14,000 remain.
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Number 6: Ahvaz, Iran.
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Thought we were done with Iran?
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Not even close.
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If you thought it was crazy how populated Aghajari was, you’ll be amazed that 1.4 million
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people live in Ahvaz, which is not only a very hot city, but one that deals with a lot
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of dust storms.
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It barely beats out Aghajari in heat, but hey, 128.3 degrees Fahrenheit is still incredibly
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hot.
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Its summers are known to be boiling hot, and the dust storms only add to the issues of
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the city, to the extent that it’s been named the most air-polluted city in the world today.
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And when you consider all the air pollution in the world…that’s quite a statement.
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Number 5: Araouane, Mali.
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Imagine yourself in a village in the middle of a desert, and the only thing for miles
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around is more desert, and over 150 miles away is a city.
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Now you know about Araouane in Mali.
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It only houses 300 people, and its only somewhat popular because it rests on a caravan route
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that takes people to a salt-mining place called Taoudenni.
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Oh, and that city 150 miles away?
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That would be Timbuktu.
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And if you were caught in a place with 130 degree Fahrenheit temperatures, you’d be getting
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on that route to Timbuktu toot sweet.
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Number 4: Kebli, Tunisia.
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If you’ve ever heard of the term “oasis”, then you know exactly what Kebli is.
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It was built to be a literal oasis from the heat of the deserts of Tunisia.
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And in fact, it’s the oldest oasis in the country.
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This isn’t just a statement though, it has proof of human life that determines it to
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be the place where some of the first humans settled in the country.
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It’s now the capital of the Kebli Governorate.
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And its record temperature is 131 degrees.
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Number 3: AL’ AZIZIYA, Libya.
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Here’s one that is a bit controversial in the world of “heat index”, because at one
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time, this was the hottest place on Earth with a massive heat recording of 136 degrees
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Fahrenheit.
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The place known as Al’Azaziya is in Libya, and is actually the capital of a district
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known as Jafara.
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Libya is, by itself, a very hot place to live because of the deserts and scorching sun and
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what not.
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But as for that recorded heat…it was found out to be fake.
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Which raises all sorts of questions.
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More accurately, it was found to be invalid, this was because of a couple things.
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First, it was taken in 1922, and equipment wasn’t as advanced as it is now.
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Two, the person who took the recording apparently wasn’t experienced, and so, in 2012, the World
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Meteorological Organization (yes, that exists) stripped it of its title.
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Bet you didn’t think that the world of temperature readings was that cutthroat huh?
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But it is.
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Despite this, there is absolute confirmation that this is one of the hottest places in
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the world on average, as their average temperature is about 120 degrees in the summer time.
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Number 2: Death Valley, USA.
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Surprised?
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It’s alright, a lot of people think that Death Valley is the hottest place on Earth (above
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the surface, obviously), and that’s because of the legends and stories that have built
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up its mystique, as well as the facts about how hot it gets.
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And make no mistake, it’s hot.
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Interestingly enough, the first trek into Death Valley (that’s documented) happened
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during the California Gold Rush.
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People were trying to cross the desert that is Death Valley in order to get to California.
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And they weren’t prepared for just how hot and unforgiving this desert is.
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It took their lives, and the name Death Valley was born.
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But what people forget is that Death Valley isn’t a desert proper, but rather, a single
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area in the Mojave Desert.
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So that begs the question, why is Death Valley so hot?
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That’s because of its position in the world.
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Mainly, it is a place that is the lowest and driest area in all of North America, and that
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creates a barren wasteland of heat.
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Its record is 134 degrees Fahrenheit.
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Want to know the most rain that Death Valley ever got?
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2.59 inches.
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And that was in January (how’s that for ironic?) in 1995.
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Two inches or so of rain is the most that this valley ever got, and that’s scary in
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its own right.
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So be smart, don’t go through this valley unless you’re prepared for everything.
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Number 1: Lut Desert, Iran.
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I’m sure if you asked most people what the hottest place on Earth was, you’d hear them
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say, “Death Valley”, but while that may the place with the highest temperature that man
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itself has measured, it’s not the hottest place on Earth.
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That would be the Lut Desert in Iran.
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You might be wondering, “Why is that the case if most people believe it’s Death Valley?”
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The answer is honestly quite simple.
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It has to do with location, and reach.
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For example, people can reach Death Valley and go to its hot spots rather easily if properly
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prepared.
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The Lut Desert in Iran is not such a place.
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So because of that, the heat of the deserts couldn’t be measured…on the ground.
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But…that’s satellites come in, and they revealed a very interesting twist on what
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actually is hot on the planet.
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“Most of the places that call themselves the hottest on Earth are not even serious contenders,”
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said team member Steven Running in a NASA statement.
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Access is key to this research: “The Earth’s hot deserts…such as the Sahara,
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the Gobi, the Sonoran and the Lut…are climatically harsh and so remote that access for routine
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measurements and maintenance of a weather station is impractical,” said team member
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David Mildrexler.
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“The majority of Earth’s hottest spots are simply not being directly measured by ground-based
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instruments.”
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But, using satellites, it discovered that the Lut Desert has reached a scorching temperature
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of 156 degrees Fahrenheit in certain areas.
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156 degrees.
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That’s 22 degrees MORE than Death Valley, which as you should know, is a pretty sizeable
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difference.
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And this was using satellite technology, which means that if they looked hard enough, they
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might find even more hotspots like this.
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That’s scary.
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What’s the hottest temperature you’ve ever experienced?
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Let us know in the comments below and…take care!


This post was previously published on YouTube.

Photo credit: Screenshot from video